Friday, August 11, 2006

BAS Column and Updates

The Biblical Archaeology Society seems to have gone after William Dever this week, with its publication of a non-complimentary book review of Did God Have a Wife? in the Sept/Oct issue. And Anson Rainey has a (web-only) column which also skewers Dever:
As Frank Cross, usually considered the dean of paleographers, once said to me, students who could not handle the languages went instead into archaeology. Sad but often true, as in Dever’s case.
The interesting thing is that if Rainey and Dever can't get along, it really shows just how fragmented the biblical-archaeological studies spectrum is (both claim to stake the "middle ground" as they fight off "minimalists" and "fundamentalists"). Time permitting, I'll have more to say about this in the future. It really says a lot about the state of the evidence.

BAS has links to some "breaking news" this week, as well as an update of this summer's archaeological excavations in Israel and Lebanon.

3 Comments:

  • I think there was an article in one of the last couple issues of BAR arguing that the term "biblical archaeology" should be dopped from use alltogether. I can't remember what alternative the author proposed.

    By Blogger psychobob, at Fri Aug 11, 10:40:00 PM  

  • It was Dever himself who led the charge against "biblical archaeology" and for several decades he refused to write for BAR. In the last few years he has realized that he sunk his own boat and now writes for BAR. I suspect Rainey's column is the first of a "dialogue" between these two. It wasn't an accident that I used that term.

    By Blogger Todd Bolen, at Sat Aug 12, 08:27:00 AM  

  • From a strictly archeological artifact perspective the question should be, "Did the Goddess Have A Husband?"
    The concept of "The Goddess" is far older than the concept of "The God".
    "The God" came down to Erope and the Middle East from the far North at the beginning of the Bronze Age.
    For 25,000 year it was the Goddess of the matralineal tribes and societies, the agriculturalist, etc. that ruled. Her husband was a secondary being. The artifacts say that the male God owes his supremacy to the bronze blade and the horse.
    The question might also be, when did God get rid of his wife? Or if their is no sex in the Kingdom of God, what are we talking about?
    Thanks for your time.

    By Anonymous drlobojo, at Wed Aug 16, 01:56:00 PM  

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