Saturday, July 10, 2010

Weekend Roundup

The area of Adullam where David hid in a cave will be destroyed by oil prospectors, according to a group of concerned citizens.

If you haven’t visited the Pool of Siloam recently (or ever), you may not have seen this artist’s reconstruction of what it looked like.

USC has an article on how new photographic methods and computer technology are helping in the deciphering of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

The Book and the Spade radio program has a new website.

Robert Cargill notes that National Geographic TV will be airing a special entitled “Writing the Dead Sea Scrolls” on July 27.  You can see a preview online.  I confess that I still have a lot of trouble believing that the primary reason for the placement of the scrolls in the Qumran caves is that fleeing Jerusalemites were hiding them from the Romans.  If that was the case, one would not expect to find all of them within a very small geographic area (not far from a settlement).

The Ancient World Online has updated its extensive list of open access journals.  Among those that might interest readers here are Hadashot Arkheologiyot and the Bulletin of the Jewish Palestine Exploration Society (1933-1967).

The May 2010 issue of BASOR is now online for subscribers.  Non-subscribers can see the table of contents and abstracts.

Hershel Shanks talks a little bit about his new autobiography in front of the camera.  He seems to relish his conviction as a thief.  Elsewhere, William Varner reviews the book quite favorably.

What did Jesus look like?  Justin Taylor revisits an article from a few years back that provides some background to the reconstruction made using “forensic anthropology.”

Logos Bible Software has a pre-publication special on the 22 volumes of the Babylonian Talmud and the 28 volumes of the Jerusalem Talmud (Neusner’s translation).  Both for $160 (for a limited time).  By the way, Neusner has written or edited 900 books, which averages out to two a month for the last 37 years. 



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